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Web push notifications

Push notifications are the best thing to happen the web since the hyperlink! Learn how we built push notifications into mobiForge, and how to add them to your own site

  • HTML5 - Posted by ruadhan - 17 Sep 2015
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    Web push notifications

  • Web push notifications are the best thing to hit the web since the hyperlink! No kidding, this technology is going to be huge. Until recently web developers could only dream of push enabled web apps. Things have changed however, and web push notifications, the asynchronous delivery of messages to a user's device from a website, even when the website is not open in the browser, are now a reality thanks to a number of HTML5 APIs:
  • HTML5 - Posted by ruadhan - 19 Aug 2015
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    Web app manifests usher new wave of progressive apps to your homescreen

  • One can’t deny the irresistible convenience of using a homescreen launcher icon to fire up a web app. Variously referred to as a bookmark icon, shortcut, or homepage icon, why shouldn’t such an icon be able to launch a web page, as well as a native app? And of course it can: this functionality has been available in Android and iOS for years. Indeed, the notion of a desktop shortcut has been around since the first GUI interfaces were developed. So why are we still talking about them in 2015?
  • HTML5 - Posted by ruadhan - 22 Jul 2015
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    Touch-friendly Drag and Drop

  • In this article we explore some touch-friendly drag and drop implementations. In particular we'll be looking at DOM and canvas-based drag and drop approaches. We'll also build on some of the things we learned in previous HTML5 articles on mobiForge.
  • HTML5 - Posted by ruadhan - 15 Jun 2015
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    The HTML5 Pointer Events API: Combining touch, mouse, and pen

  • The Pointer Events API is an HTML5 specification that combines touch, mouse, pen and other inputs into a single unified API. It is less well supported than the Touch Events API, although support is growing, with all the major browsers working on an implementation, except for Apple's Safari. There's a colorful background to how the current state of browser support for this API came to be which we covered previously on mobiForge, but in this article we'll just look at its usage.
  • User Experience - Posted by ronan - 11 May 2015
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    Measuring page weight

  • It used to be so easy. Measuring the weight of a web page in the early days of the web was merely a matter of waiting for the page to finish loading and then counting up the size of its constituent resources.
  • Device Detection - Posted by pawelpiejko - 27 Apr 2015
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    How to switch User Agents in desktop browsers

  • Looking to test mobile websites in your desktop browser? Or, maybe you need to test page weight and load times in the mobile environment? These tasks are easily done by changing the browser’s default User Agent header. This article describes a few simple methods of switching User Agents in desktop browsers.
  • Geolocation - Posted by ruadhan - 18 Feb 2015
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    Using the Google Maps API to display mobile-friendly maps on all devices

  • In this article we show how to embed a Google Map in a web page so that it will be mobile-friendly and work on all devices, including low-end devices without JavaScript support. To do this, we'll use the Google Maps API for high-end devices that can handle JavaScript, and for low-end we make use of the simpler Google Static Maps API.
  • iPhone - Posted by weimenglee - 30 Oct 2014
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    Why Swift Flies for iOS Developers

  • Now that the dust has settled somewhat on Swift, the new language on the block for developing iOS and OSX applications, we take a look at its impact and improvements over its predecessor, Objective-C. Apple claims Swift to be a modern, safe, and powerful language for developing for iOS and OSX. Just how powerful is Swift compared to the venerable Objective-C? And how does it make developing applications easier and safer?
  • Browsers - Posted by mclancy - 22 Oct 2014
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    Detecting Language Preference from the Browser with Accept Header

  • Some time ago I was on a trip to Germany for the Smashing Mag event. Several websites I visited (including the world’s largest search engine) asked me to confirm my language preferences based on my current physical location. This struck me as a rather inefficient approach to setting language preferences. Especially given the language of the browser is readily available to web publishers as part of the HTTP request.